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Monday, 20 October 2014 00:32

The Importance of Folk Culture

Written by M. Oliver Heydorn
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In our contemporary world, dominated as it is by a dysfunctional (read unbalanced) financial system that is leveraged by a credit monopoly, indigenous folk cultures are being threatened and gradually eroded. Their replacement by a vacuous, cosmopolitan, politically correct, and consumerist culture serves the interests of those who wish to breakdown natural cultural differences in order to centralize power in the hands of an international oligarchic elite. Indigenous folk cultures are a key element in a society's social credit, i.e., a society's capacity to deliver satisfactory results to its various members. People who share a cultural 'operating system' that is organically derived are, as many studies have shown, far more likely to trust and understand each other and to therefore co-operate effectively for the sake of mutual advantage. Folk cultures effortlessly provide a common identity and direction, a natural sense of belonging, that cannot be replicated by any amount of social engineering. In view of their importance for human functioning and well-being, it is wonderful to see that folk cultures are still very much alive in many parts of the world, as this video celebrating traditional basque dancing demonstrates:

 

 

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  • Comment Link  Wallace Klinck Saturday, 10 February 2018 23:38 posted by Wallace Klinck

    Excellent observations. There is more to life than bread alone and when people are forever challenged to obtain material security and are subject increasing servitude to debt they have less time to devote to cultural activities. When a satisfactory life is not attainable in their own lands people tend to scatter over the earth to other nations in a quest for a better standard of living. This type of movement is
    destructive to culture when It does not happen naturally and organically but primarily consequent to a defective system of finance that fails, even though production efficiency has increased manyfold, to yield falling prices and increasing leisure. We desperately need National Dividends and Compensated Prices in order that prices might reflect actual increases in production efficiency without creating un-repayable debt.

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