Sunday, 05 March 2017 23:20

The Social Credit Bottom Line

Written by

The modern, industrial system possesses an enormous productive capacity, both actual and potential, to meet our legitimate needs for goods and services. With every technological advancement we can produce more and/or better with less resource consumption and less human labour.

Thursday, 21 July 2016 21:01

Social Credit in a Sentence

Written by

What is Social Credit? I have often been asked to explain it in a nutshell. So, as far as the purely economic aspects of Social Credit are concerned, here it goes

Friday, 22 January 2016 19:56

An Introduction to Social Credit

Written by

The following article will be published in the first edition of the Portuguese Journal "Libertária"

Thursday, 05 March 2015 00:21

The Social Credit Angle

Written by

Systems that aim to organise people can be placed into one of two groups; systems that limit peoples' freedoms and those that increase them. The latter philosophy is the foundation of the Social Credit movement conceived by the Anglo-Scottish Engineer Major Clifford Hugh Douglas.

Monday, 17 November 2014 04:51

Three Guiding Social Credit Principles

Written by

When trying to grasp the Social Credit approach to economic matters, it is important to keep the following three principles in mind...

Monday, 14 July 2014 00:42

What is Social Credit All About?

Written by

As this is the inaugural blog entry for 'The Clifford Hugh Douglas Institute for the Study and Promotion of Social Credit’, it seemed fitting to deal upfront with the central question which invariably preoccupies the minds of most newcomers to the subject: what exactly is Social Credit?

Latest Articles

  • A Favourable Balance of Trade? - New Animated Video
    This is the first professional animated presentation of one key aspect of the Douglas or British Social Credit case (not to be confused with Chinese 'Social Credit'): the folly of 'favourable' trade balances under the existing financial system, where physical loss and inefficiency are financially rewarded.
    Written on Friday, 27 September 2019 04:04 Read more...
  • Problems with Taxes
    Relying on bank credit, indirectly through taxation or directly via borrowing, to fund a Universal Basic Income (UBI) scheme is untenable. A fundamental reform of the financial system is the only viable means to ensure a future in which sustainable purchasing power is in the hands of the Canadian consumer. There is no need to take from Peter to give to Paul. Not one penny of anyone’s income would need to be redistributed. There is enough for everyone to have an income, a UBI, under a corrected financial system as advocated by Douglas Social Credit.
    Written on Tuesday, 16 July 2019 14:59 Read more...
  • Living Beyond Your Means
    We are often told that people should not ‘live beyond their means’, that is, that no individual person, nor any corporate entity like a business or a government, should spend more money during a given period than they take in as income or as revenue. Doing so is judged to be profligate, irresponsible, and only setting oneself up for pain in the long run. For countless centuries, if not millennia, the balanced ‘budget’ has been regarded as the sine qua non of fiscal prudence and ‘sound’ finance. And yet, if we look at our economies over any given period of time, it is quite normal for individual consumers, considered in the aggregate, to spend more than they receive in income, for governments at all levels to spend more than they take in viataxes, and even for businesses, considered again as a whole, to spend more money (thanks to long-term capital…
    Written on Monday, 15 July 2019 13:21 Read more...