Action FAQ

1. What is the Social Credit movement?

The Social Credit movement is a world-wide movement of individuals which has existed since the early 1920’s. Social Crediters are people who: a) wish to live in much healthier societies, i.e., societies that are politically and economically functional rather than dysfunctional (in view of the true purposes of economic and political association) and who: b) believe that the social analysis and remedial proposals of C.H. Douglas encapsulate the key policies, principles, and mechanisms that must be adopted if this goal is to be successfully achieved. As such, the Social Credit movement is both open to and in need of the co-operation of each and every individual, prior to and independently of any question of race, ethnicity, gender, nationality, political or religious affiliation, etc. By working in a co-operative, law-abiding, and non-violent manner, Social Crediters are confident that economic and political associations can be suitably re-aligned (i.e., in keeping with the correct principles of association) so as to deliver far more satisfactory results to their individual members.

2. What are "Social Credit Action Groups"?

Social Credit Action Groups are self-organizing and self-financing groups which work under the banner of the C.H. Douglas Institute in order to forward, in a concrete way, the aims of the Social Credit movement. They represent an attempt to make use of the correct principles of association so that Social Crediters can effectively associate in the service of common interests. We suggest that each group should be small, i.e., composed of a minimum of three or four persons and a maximum of twelve persons, with a President, Vice-President, Secretary and Treasurer. Groups that register with the Institute will have the name of the group and its leader, together with the Groups contact information, placed on this website so that interested individuals may affiliate with groups in their local areas.

3. What sorts of activities may Social Credit Action Groups undertake?

In seeking to bring society into alignment with Social Credit principles, Social Credit Action Groups may choose to engage in a number of activities that will broadly fall into one of two categories: a) education and b) political action. The purpose of Social Credit education is to raise the general level of awareness regarding the Social Credit analysis and remedial proposals as well as Social Credit themes and concerns among the general public, or else to train individuals who may become Social Credit technicians and expositors. Activities that lend themselves to this end may include, for example, the formation of study and reading circles, the holding of lectures and rallies, and the distribution of Social Credit literature. The purpose of Social Credit political action is to put pressure on the centres of political power so that they will become aware of, take seriously, and eventually implement Social Credit principles into the economic and political life of one’s nation. Activities that can be undertaken in service of this end may include, for example, letter writing campaigns to political representatives, the lobbying of public officials, and electoral campaigns (organizing the population so that they will only vote for candidates who, regardless of political party affiliation, promise to support Social Credit policies). It is important that Social Crediters speak in one coherent voice in order to maximize their effectiveness. Relying on a centralized source for information will ensure the integrity and recognisability of the message. For this reason, the Institute freely provides a number of resources (such as pamphlets and leaflets) which can be used as promotional material.

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Latest Articles

  • Social Credit and Democracy: The Problem - Part Two
    In this second article, I will continue to examine some of the structural problems with conventional democratic political systems that Douglas had identified in the course of his writings, especially in the writings of his latter years. Beyond the particular defects in the voting system which were discussed in the previous month’s article, there are also problems with the party system and with how the voting and party systems interact with each other. Since there is quite a bit of information to cover, I beg the reader’s indulgence if the following is reminiscent of a lawyer’s seriatim brief.
    Monday, 20 August 2018 17:27 Read more...
  • Social Credit and Democracy: The Problem
    Social Credit political theory readily grants what lies, perhaps, at the root of the democratic urge and which accounts, in large measure, for the popular appeal of ‘democracy’: firstly, that governments should serve the common good of the people and secondly, if governments don’t serve the common good of the people in an effective, efficient, and fair manner, the people who are affected should have the ability to sanction the government so that the quality of government might immediately improve. At the same time, Douglas was highly critical of the conventional ‘democracies’ that have come to characterize the Liberal West, often describing them as ‘ineffective’. Not only did they fail to serve the common good to the extent that this was physically possible and desirable, they also failed to provide the people with an effective vehicle for remedying this sorry state of affairs. To make matters worse, it was not…
    Monday, 23 July 2018 10:58 Read more...
  • Social Environment Implications of Social Credit Proposals for Income Supplementation
    It is peculiar that discussion of governmental policy frequently proceeds with hardly a nod to the most clamant fact in the world of economics, namely the massive, and burgeoning, financial debt that hangs like the sword of Damocles over human society. The dimensions of this debt, which is growing at an exponential rate, have been calculated variously by different organizations applying themselves to its study. One such organization, the Institute of International Finance, has calculated total global debt at the end of 2016 to be $217 trillion, having risen by something approaching a quarter of this sum over just the previous decade. Even more shocking than these numbers is the fact that the aggregate debt is reckoned to be more than three times globally aggregated GDPs.
    Wednesday, 11 July 2018 15:26 Read more...