Clifford Hugh Douglass Social Credit

Social Credit Theory

Social Credit Theory Individuals who are unfamiliar with Social Credit, or who wish to deepen their understanding, may begin their exploration of this site by browsing our 'Social Credit Theory' pages.

 

Social Credit Action

Social Credit ActionIndividuals who have already attained an adequate comprehension of Social Credit theory and who desire to do something to make Social Credit a reality may go directly to our 'Social Credit Action' pages.

 
 

What is the C.H. Douglas Institute?

HummingbirdThe C.H. Douglas Institute is a registered not-for-profit organization that is committed to furthering Social Credit education and facilitating Social Credit advocacy. ‘Social Credit’ being the name which is typically given to that coherent and cogent body of thought on social matters that was first developed in the early decades of the twentieth century by the brilliant Anglo-Scottish engineer, Major Clifford Hugh Douglas. On the one hand, the institute seeks to introduce the wider public to Douglas’ economic, political, and cultural ideas, while deepening the understanding of those who have already had some exposure to Social Credit. On the other hand, we wish to bolster the efforts of all those who have grasped the tremendous value and relevance of the Social Credit analysis and remedial proposals and who therefore wish to work for the establishment of a Social Credit commonwealth. This institute proposes to provide the necessary assistance by serving as a co-ordinating and resource centre for the wider Social Credit movement. Although based in the province of Ontario, Canada, we are keenly interested in assisting all suitably motivated individuals and groups, wherever they may be, in their endeavour to bring their respective societies into greater alignment with Social Credit principles. 

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Unrestrained by the financial system, the resources of modern production would be sufficient
to provide for the material desires of the whole population of the world
at the expense of a small and decreasing amount of labour....

C.H. Douglas, The Monopoly of Credit

Latest Articles

  • The Scales and the Dam
    "One of the very first lessons in a typical introductory economics course - and rarely, if ever questioned by either teacher or pupil - is the existence of resource scarcity coupled with the unlimited desires of humanity. Students are then informed that economics is the 'science' of managing (rather than overcoming) this scarcity - and in time, they learn how to manage it in their favour at the expense of others."
    Written on Sunday, 10 March 2019 17:11 Read more...
  • The Hydroelectric Dam as a Metaphor for Social Credit
    In a recent paper entitled “The Scales and the Dam: Static and Dynamic Conceptions of the Economy”, Arindam Basu has introduced a brilliant metaphor that can be adapted in various ways to explain both how the economy functions under the existing financial system and how it would function under Social Credit: “A typical run-of-river hydroelectric dam, which uses a flow of water to generate a flow of electricity, may serve quite well as a metaphor for an economy that converts a flow of money into a flow of goods and services.”[1] As Arindam notes, this analogy can be developed further in a variety of ways.
    Written on Friday, 08 March 2019 17:31 Read more...
  • Social Credit and Democracy: The Problem - Part Five
    Thus far, we have looked at the whats and the whys of the financial domination of liberal democracy. It is now time that we turn to a more detailed examination of the hows. Let us begin with the general observation that, in a society operating under the Monopoly of Credit, organized political activity, like most other activities, is largely dependent – directly or indirectly – on Finance. Money, both in the form of producer credit and in the form of income, is maintained in a state of artificial scarcity, and Finance will naturally be inclined to ration it to those who do its will and to punish those who resist by denying them access to the life-giving credit. Credit, in turn, is a necessary means for obtaining most of the material and human resources required for political action. In this way, Finance can condition political activity to the point of…
    Written on Monday, 31 December 2018 22:25 Read more...