Clifford Hugh Douglass Social Credit

Social Credit Theory

Social Credit Theory Individuals who are unfamiliar with Social Credit, or who wish to deepen their understanding, may begin their exploration of this site by browsing our 'Social Credit Theory' pages.

 

Social Credit Action

Social Credit ActionIndividuals who have already attained an adequate comprehension of Social Credit theory and who desire to do something to make Social Credit a reality may go directly to our 'Social Credit Action' pages.

 
 

What is the C.H. Douglas Institute?

HummingbirdThe C.H. Douglas Institute is a registered not-for-profit organization that is committed to furthering Social Credit education and facilitating Social Credit advocacy. ‘Social Credit’ being the name which is typically given to that coherent and cogent body of thought on social matters that was first developed in the early decades of the twentieth century by the brilliant Anglo-Scottish engineer, Major Clifford Hugh Douglas. On the one hand, the institute seeks to introduce the wider public to Douglas’ economic, political, and cultural ideas, while deepening the understanding of those who have already had some exposure to Social Credit. On the other hand, we wish to bolster the efforts of all those who have grasped the tremendous value and relevance of the Social Credit analysis and remedial proposals and who therefore wish to work for the establishment of a Social Credit commonwealth. This institute proposes to provide the necessary assistance by serving as a co-ordinating and resource centre for the wider Social Credit movement. Although based in the province of Ontario, Canada, we are keenly interested in assisting all suitably motivated individuals and groups, wherever they may be, in their endeavour to bring their respective societies into greater alignment with Social Credit principles. 

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Unrestrained by the financial system, the resources of modern production would be sufficient
to provide for the material desires of the whole population of the world
at the expense of a small and decreasing amount of labour....

C.H. Douglas, The Monopoly of Credit

Latest Articles

  • Social Credit and Democracy: The Problem
    Social Credit political theory readily grants what lies, perhaps, at the root of the democratic urge and which accounts, in large measure, for the popular appeal of ‘democracy’: firstly, that governments should serve the common good of the people and secondly, if governments don’t serve the common good of the people in an effective, efficient, and fair manner, the people who are affected should have the ability to sanction the government so that the quality of government might immediately improve. At the same time, Douglas was highly critical of the conventional ‘democracies’ that have come to characterize the Liberal West, often describing them as ‘ineffective’. Not only did they fail to serve the common good to the extent that this was physically possible and desirable, they also failed to provide the people with an effective vehicle for remedying this sorry state of affairs. To make matters worse, it was not…
    Monday, 23 July 2018 10:58 Read more...
  • Social Environment Implications of Social Credit Proposals for Income Supplementation
    It is peculiar that discussion of governmental policy frequently proceeds with hardly a nod to the most clamant fact in the world of economics, namely the massive, and burgeoning, financial debt that hangs like the sword of Damocles over human society. The dimensions of this debt, which is growing at an exponential rate, have been calculated variously by different organizations applying themselves to its study. One such organization, the Institute of International Finance, has calculated total global debt at the end of 2016 to be $217 trillion, having risen by something approaching a quarter of this sum over just the previous decade. Even more shocking than these numbers is the fact that the aggregate debt is reckoned to be more than three times globally aggregated GDPs.
    Wednesday, 11 July 2018 15:26 Read more...
  • The Economy of the Gift
     The implications of a debt-free universal dividend via C.H. Douglas’s Social Credit monetary and economic reform, a dividend that would be distributed equally to everyone, will be far more than just extra cash in one’s wallet. There would be deep and far reaching impacts in the areas of society and culture where changes would occur that would most definitely be for the betterment of mankind.
    Sunday, 01 July 2018 14:21 Read more...