Monday, 17 November 2014 04:51

Three Guiding Social Credit Principles

Written by M. Oliver Heydorn
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As a philosopher, I have a great appreciation for the importance of foundational principles.


When trying to grasp the Social Credit approach to economic matters, it is important to keep the following three principles in mind:

1. Economic life should be organized in such a way that it faciliates, to the greatest possible physical extent, the fulfillment of the true purpose of economic association: the delivery of goods and services, as, when, and where required, and with the least amount of trouble to everyone.

(Contemporary economic life is not properly organized. The present system does not produce everything people can use with profit to themselves in the most efficient manner possible. In other words, it fails to fulfill its purpose well. Instead, it generates enormous waste and is highly inefficient in providing an insufficient volume of those goods and services that are truly wanted. These unsatisfactory results are largely due to the dysfunctional nature of the conventional financial system.)

 

2. In order for economic life to truly flourish (after the pattern outlined in principle #1), the financial system must be designed in such a way that it reflects, as accurately as possible, every change (potential or actual) in the production and consumption phases of the economic cycle.

(The present financial system does not reflect the facts of the physical economy in an isomorphic fashion. Instead, it systematically underestimates and hence artifcially limits the capacity of the physical economy to produce and distribute the goods and services that people can use with profit to themselves.) 

 

3. Whenever one is faced with a variety of different mechanisms to choose from, one should select that mechanism that works best in practice in delivering the intended results.

Last modified on Friday, 23 March 2018 13:17

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