“Subsidiarity” is the name given to the principle that a central authority should have a subsidiary function, performing only those tasks which cannot be performed at a more local level.

Tuesday, 07 July 2015 00:30

Laudato Si and Missed Opportunities

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The latest encyclical, Laudato Si, is generating a great deal of heat both inside and outside of the Catholic Church – and more heat than light I am afraid. Instead of discussing the various and, in some cases, quite serious scientific, philosophical, and theological concerns that a number of commentators have raised in reference to it (consider, for example, the following interview with Chris Ferrara:

The following review of my booklet The Economics of Social Credit and Catholic Social Teaching was recently published by James Reed in Australia:

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