Social Credit News

Friday, 16 January 2015 00:52

Monopoly - A Short Film

Written by M. Oliver Heydorn
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Georgiana (Gigi) Pinwill from Australia has just initiated a very exciting and promising project. She has prepared a script entitled "Monopoly" for a short film, which will hopefully serve as the starting point for a longer, feature-length production. The purpose of the film is to attempt something that, to my knowledge, has never been done before: an exploration of Social Credit themes through the medium of the dramatic arts. I have read the script and have been quite favourably impressed with its content. The film will be effective in communicating the essence of the Social Credit message to new audiences.

Georgiana has descibed the project as follows:

This short film is designed to challenge preconceived ideas about the economy and the way things 'should' be. After the main character is transported into a future time zone, he encounters new ways of organising society. Humour ensues with the culture clash, or 'time-clash.' This new society has based itself on the current day board game of Monopoly. This script is about imagination, a better world, and the realm of possibilities. Art rarely addresses economic issues in an informed manner, and this is a chance to change that. When the worlds of art and economics come together, change can happen by engaging emotionally and mentally with global issues.

This film was inspired by Social Credit values and ideas, and such films/series as "Doctor Who," "What Women Want" with Mel Gibson, "Thirteen going Thirty," "Narnia," "Kate and Leopold" with Hugh Jackman, and others.

The cost of production is consumption and, under the existing economic regime, it is necessary to have access to financial credit in order to consume. Hence, in order to produce, one must have a revenue stream. If you would like to donate to this project, you can do so via Indiegogo: https://www.indiegogo.com/projects/monopoly-short-film.

Georgiana's star now profile can be found here: www.starnow.com/georgianap.

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2 comments

  • Comment Link Ian Sunday, 11 February 2018 00:57 posted by Ian

    Is there any chance we would see the scrypt ?

  • Comment Link Walter Sunday, 11 February 2018 00:57 posted by Walter

    I think that the first thing to do is to explain to the people what is wrong with the system being used instead of making that fatal mistake of ramming Social Credit down peoples throats. People do not know what is wrong because if they did something would of been done about it by the people. I am sick and tired of listening to Social Crediters getting shoved around by the experts of the system being used. Base your story completely upon the teachings in Douglas's speech "THE TRAGEDY OF HUMAN EFFORT" otherwise this effort will be another complete waste of time again and a denigration of Social Credit. This speech he explains socialism and communism and also the meaning and action of Democracy. In his last notice to Social Crediters he warned about forming a political party but know the un-kown went ahead and failed. They let the politician dominate with "Funny Money" instead of pushing the Social Credit ideology through each individuals political party and then it would of been their idea but as it is at this moment it is an insult to Douglas coming from a group of people who really do not want his ideas to proliferate. They want theirs to dominate.
    One great teacher said, "I came that you might have life and have it more abundantly." Every single 'ISM' we have now and into the future is making sure that this does not happen. Social Credit does not end in 'ISM.'

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