Social Credit News

Thursday, 29 January 2015 00:56

A Social Credit Post on henrymakow.com

Written by M. Oliver Heydorn
Rate this item
(0 votes)

Just yesterday, Henry Makow posted the most succinct explanation of the economic aspects of Social Credit that I have written to date. The article may be found here:

http://henrymakow.com/2015/01/social-credit-a-simple-explanation.html

 

The Clifford Hugh Douglas Institute would like to thank Dr. Makow for sharing Social Credit with his readers.

Leave a comment

Make sure you enter all the required information, indicated by an asterisk (*). HTML code is not allowed.

Latest Articles

  • The Scales and the Dam
    "One of the very first lessons in a typical introductory economics course - and rarely, if ever questioned by either teacher or pupil - is the existence of resource scarcity coupled with the unlimited desires of humanity. Students are then informed that economics is the 'science' of managing (rather than overcoming) this scarcity - and in time, they learn how to manage it in their favour at the expense of others."
    Written on Sunday, 10 March 2019 17:11 Read more...
  • The Hydroelectric Dam as a Metaphor for Social Credit
    In a recent paper entitled “The Scales and the Dam: Static and Dynamic Conceptions of the Economy”, Arindam Basu has introduced a brilliant metaphor that can be adapted in various ways to explain both how the economy functions under the existing financial system and how it would function under Social Credit: “A typical run-of-river hydroelectric dam, which uses a flow of water to generate a flow of electricity, may serve quite well as a metaphor for an economy that converts a flow of money into a flow of goods and services.”[1] As Arindam notes, this analogy can be developed further in a variety of ways.
    Written on Friday, 08 March 2019 17:31 Read more...
  • Social Credit and Democracy: The Problem - Part Five
    Thus far, we have looked at the whats and the whys of the financial domination of liberal democracy. It is now time that we turn to a more detailed examination of the hows. Let us begin with the general observation that, in a society operating under the Monopoly of Credit, organized political activity, like most other activities, is largely dependent – directly or indirectly – on Finance. Money, both in the form of producer credit and in the form of income, is maintained in a state of artificial scarcity, and Finance will naturally be inclined to ration it to those who do its will and to punish those who resist by denying them access to the life-giving credit. Credit, in turn, is a necessary means for obtaining most of the material and human resources required for political action. In this way, Finance can condition political activity to the point of…
    Written on Monday, 31 December 2018 22:25 Read more...