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Friday, 05 September 2014 11:04

Humans Need Not Apply

Written by Oliver Heydorn
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The following video, entitled "Humans Need not Apply", has received over 2 million hits on youtube. It explains how the development of intelligent machines (computers, robots, etc.) now threatens many of the occupations that traditionally relied on brain-power (while continuing to threaten those jobs that rely primarily on muscle power). The result is that more and more people are ending up and will continue to end up being permanently unemployed. The solution to this growing problem is the solution offered by Social Credit.

People must be granted access to goods and services regardless of whether their work is required by the formal economy or not. Furthermore, that access must not further indebt society, nor be dependent on redistributive taxation. It must be financed through the creation of a suitable volume of debt-free money to equate the rate of flow of consumer prices with the rate of flow of consumer incomes. The same phenomenon which, on the physical plane, is rendering people permanently unemployed (i.e., the replacement of human labour by machines) is the same phenomenon which, on the financial plane, is chiefly responsible for the gap between the rate at which the prices of goods and services are generated and the rate at which income is distributed by any modern productive process (machines or real capital involve, under current financial and accountancy conventions, the levying of financial charges for which no or an insufficient volume of income is simultaneously being liberated). Social Credit kills two birds with one stone by effectively addressing both sides of the central social problem of our age: the financial system that we've got is not designed to deal appropriately with the realities of industrial progress.

 

 

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3 comments

  • Comment Link  Dan Parker Friday, 09 February 2018 22:52 posted by Dan Parker

    Suggested edit.

    "The result is that more and more people are ending up and will continue to end up being permanently unemployed", if they are not consigned to meaningless 'busywork' that needlessly damages our environment and of course the individual.

    Anyways, sure you can word it better, but busywork is a huge environmental problem today, not to mention its effect on an individual who has most of their waking hours robbed.

  • Comment Link Oliver Friday, 09 February 2018 22:52 posted by Oliver

    Hi Cecilia,
    You are right to hint at some of the dangers of technology. Indeed, human beings can and often do become slaves to the machine in various ways. At the same time, it seems to me that the problem is not with technology as such (in may ways technology wisely used is a great blessing, both in terms of what it can produce and by freeing men from toil), but rather with the sort of conditions which the present dysfunctional financial system imposes on our relationship with technology. In other words, what is key is that we are capable of defining that relationship so that technology will serve us, instead of being enslaved or otherwise impoverished by our dependency on machines. The present financial system, with its artificial scarcity of purchasing power, makes it much more difficult than it otherwise would be to be the master rather than the servant of the machine.

  • Comment Link cecilia Friday, 09 February 2018 22:52 posted by cecilia

    It's frightening to see what the upcoming generations are facing. some of us who have lived before technology and total automation, were given the opportunity to experience life as it should be and although we were categorized according to social class, educational levels, etc., we took pride in contributing to the work force, which in turn gave us pride and a sense of worth. As human beings we've always left 'room for error'; automation is too perfect, too artificial and too deceitful. This leads us to wonder, who the REAL robots will be. God bless the new and upcoming generations.

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