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Thursday, 14 May 2015 10:32

The Knowableness of Finance

Written by Will Waite
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It is the purpose of Social Credit proposals regarding finance to make the figures fit the facts.[1] In other words, the subordination of finance to reality.

It would be expected in this age of confusion, where perspective and reality are taken for the same thing, that someone might ask, 'what reality?'

At present we allow the language of finance to shape our perception of reality. Under the spell of this outlook, the money shortage makes scarce that which is abundant, resources of people, unemployment of leisure, and labour saving machinery a slave driver. It turns facts into figures. The financial system makes the instrument we require to carry out our business a liability and a limitation against the very wealth it was created to represent and distribute. It's like a tractor designed to get bogged.

There are a great many things destined to remain unknown to us. Finance is not one of these things. Man created the system in its entirety. It is a machine driven by people in pursuit of objectives. Can we know the truth about how a kettle works? Of course we can. Can we isolate what is wrong with it when it doesn’t work? Again, yes. And when we discover the problem, we fix it so that it boils water, or we throw it away and get a different one.

It is high time we examined, as individuals, the machinery of the financial system. To think about what we want of it and how we can get this machine to do the things we want it to do. We do not want a government from our economic system. We do not want employment for the sake of employment and we do not want all this waste and war.

 

Reproduced with permission from socialcredit.com.au:

http://www.socialcredit.com.au/easy-blog/entry/48-the-knowableness-of-finance

 

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1. Douglas, C.H. 1922. The Control and Distribution of Production. London: Cecil Palmer

Last modified on Sunday, 11 February 2018 10:35

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