Social Credit News

Items filtered by date: September 2014

Monday, 27 October 2014 07:11

America's Puritanical Obsession with Work

A few months ago, Abby Martin from Russia Today criticized the unhealthy obsession with work that characterizes American culture. The average American between 25-54 who has at least one child spends nine hours every day working

Published in Social Credit News

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